Sabah's surging nativism boils down to hurting pockets

Boats awaiting passengers at the waterfront near Kota Kinabalu's markets, among them the Filipino Market, so named for the migrant traders and workers that abound there.
Boats awaiting passengers at the waterfront near Kota Kinabalu's markets, among them the Filipino Market, so named for the migrant traders and workers that abound there. ST PHOTO: SHANNON TEOH

KOTA KINABALU - When undergraduate Veveonah Mosibin uploaded a video of herself climbing a tree in the northern tip of Sabah in June to get Internet access for an online exam, it quickly became a viral icon of Malaysia's second-poorest state's lack of infrastructural development.

But it was only when snap polls were called in July - after defectors deprived Chief Minister Shafie Apdal of control of the state legislature - that it became a touchpaper political issue.

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